training programs

Year in review

At the end of every season you should take a break from focused training. I’m not saying you shouldn’t ride your bike...not at all! But you should stop looking at your heart rate monitor, your power data and even your personal training duration for a few weeks. This helps to relax the mind, rejuvenate and reboot yourself. We don’t often think about it, but disciplined training is mentally taxing; it’s just plain tiring. Sometimes at the end of a good season the body will feel like it is ready to keep going but the mind still needs a break. After this ‘cooling off’ period I usually add very loosely-structured training with small goals to my riders’ training diaries. These goals are usually pretty simple: do a 4-hour ride 3 times a month, accumulate 3 to 5 hours of tempo per week or maybe do a club ride just for fun once a week. These workouts and weekly goals are low stress, low commitment and allow your brain to slowly get used to the mental workload that is coming when training season arrives.

Riders should find that rides during this time of the year are meant to be fun, motivating and inspiring. This is also the time when you should review how your riding and racing season went during the past year. New-found inspiration and motivation will help you see the future and all its possibilities. You should try to assess whether or not you’ve met the goals you set for yourself this past year and whether you want to try and improve on your gains. Maybe you want to attack those shortfalls that you may notice in this review. Maybe you’ll want to set entirely different goals for the coming year. It’s all possible, and it’s up to you!

Setting goals is paramount. If you’ve never set goals in past seasons you should try doing it this coming year. If my athletes are planning on competing in the upcoming racing season, I have them try to set at least three goals to strive for. After all, if you know what goals you want to achieve you can then measure how close you’ve come to attaining your desired results and make adjustments in successive years.

Setting goals is one of my favorite parts of riding and racing because I have the opportunity to entertain all the possible things I can try to accomplish, and that’s just fun! But remember: goals should be challenging and attainable. After you set some goals you should make sure to keep a record of the training you do, being sure to add comments about how you felt during and after your training sessions. You should also make sure to set milestone markers to measure whether you are moving in the right direction in order to attain your goals.

In my next blog post I’ll talk about setting accomplishable goals for your next season.

See you on the road, Coach Jesse Eisner

Did you have goals this past season? Did you achieve them? If you need help setting goals for next season and you need direction in how to achieve those goals, let the coaches at Crank Cycling know. We can help!

Hone Your Handling Skills

In order to hone your cycling skills it is important to practice them in a controlled environment. This means you should practice riding fast, cornering, and riding in groups. Creating a controlled environment is the hardest part of practicing these skills. To do so you need a safe place to ride and at least one experienced rider who has mastered all of the skills being practiced. Crank Cycling Coaches can help you do this.

Do you want to cruise through the field of riders and find the sweet spot in the peloton? Do you want to slide into the draft and reap the benefits of others' hard work? Would you like to glide through corners at high speeds, not hitting your brakes and not having to over-analyze the word Apex on google search for hours? Do you want to make it over, through, and around obstacles and hazards without worry?

Would you like to keep up on the local club ride without being afraid of riders coming too close to you, or the constant thought of being dropped and not able to catch up at the regroup spot?

All of these things can be accomplished and your mind can be set at ease with some classroom instruction and on-the-bike practice. Come to Crank Cycling's bike-handling and group riding skills clinic on April 16th, presented by Crank Cycling Coach Jesse Eisner. Jesse is a USA Cycling Certified coach and veteran racer with 2 decades worth of riding and racing experience.

See you out on the road, Coach Jesse

Link to sign up

http://clients.mindbodyonline.com/ws.asp?studioid=7102&stype=-102

Heat Acclimatization

One of the riders I have been coaching for several years is training for the SCNCA time trial championship. Last year when he raced there, it was an unusually warm day and the heat really got to him. Steve lives in San Diego, where the weather is quite temperate, but the race is in Lake Los Angeles where it gets MUCH warmer in May. In fact the lake Los Angeles area is typically at least 10-15 degrees warmer in May than coastal San Diego Where Steve lives. So 2 weeks ago Steve started working to acclimitize to the heat by working out in his sun room twice a week. He set up the trainer, turns on the heater and just goes for it. Heat accilimitization starts to occur in is little as 3 days, and full accilimitization can be achieved in as little as 2 weeks. Acclimitiazation adaptations simply allow the body to stay a little cooler AND operate at a higher level when hot. These adaptations include increased blood volume, increased skin blood flow increased sweat rate, and changes in the sweat itself.Steve is off to race in the 50+ category. Good luck steve, those hot trainer sessions should pay off!

Strengths and Weaknesses

One of the hardest things to access as an athlete is what part of training you should focus on. I have my athletes spend the majority of their time working on their strengths. If they are a talented sprinter, we work on making their initial jump stronger and their top end speed faster. If they are a talented time trailist, we work on pushing their threshold power or threshold heart rate up gradually.That is not to say that you shouldn't work on your weaknesses. For example, it is always good to work on your sprint. If you are a time trialist and you are in break up the road, you may have to sprint with your breakaway companions. However, you shouldn't spend inordinate amounts of time on things that only produce limited benefits.

If you would like to sit down with a Crank Cycling coach to discuss your potential strengths and weaknesses, drop us a line or send us an email.

See you out on the road.

Cheers, Coach Jesse