Promotions

Great SRM Deal with the new PC8!

Wow, this is a really great deal we are authorized to offer through SRM, and many people will find this too good to pass up.   Its pretty simple, you get a new Dura Ace SRM training system for only $2995.  It comes with a PC7 and a voucher to upgrade to the PC8 at no cost when it comes out in December.  That is a pretty cool deal if you ask me!     Just conact Coach Burke: Sean@CrankCycling.com,  or call us at 619-865-3389 and he'll get you started on your new SRM! Amazing SRM Deal

How To Use a Training Diary, or Keeping Track of the Important Stuff!

Most professional and top amateur athletes keep a training diary.

Training diaries are used to keep record of your training rides and races to track your progress over long periods of time. As a coach I have all my athletes keep a training diary. When filling out a training diary, it is important to record both subjective and objective data. You will also need some way to keep track of training metrics. With some performance testing, discipline, and a diary tracking your training, you can achieve those all-important long term gains in your cycling.

Subjective Data:

Subjective data is information about how you felt during a particular effort or training session. When recording your efforts, make sure to give detailed information about how each effort felt to you as well as how long your efforts were. How you feel is not just important on days when you do hard intervals: it’s equally important on your easy, recovery days. ‘Grade’ your workouts in order to track your progress. I like to use the traditional ‘A’ through ‘F’ scale with plus or minus indications on each grade if applicable.

Objective Data:

Objective measurements or ‘metrics’ are critical to record in your training diary. There are more than a few types of metrics to use when keeping records of your training activities. The coaches at Crank Cycling use Training Peaks software to record metrics with their athletes. Using metrics that give you specific data points like watts from a power meter or heart rate from heart rate monitors are best. Most power meters and heart rate monitors come with a software program to upload your data files for analysis. These are certainly not the only kinds of metrics available, but they are the most reliable. Here are four metrics that I use with my clients and a brief explanation of how they work.

Heart Rate is one of the older metrics available and there’s quite a bit of information about it out there in books, cycling magazines and on the internet. Because heart rate can be influenced by many variables (atmospheric temperature, stress, sleeping habits and diet, for instance) this metric has some inherent limits that will affect and limit reliability.

Wattage measured by a power meter is not new to cycling but power meters have become super reliable in the last few years. They’re inexpensive enough that even a beginning cycling enthusiast can afford one and use it with ease. Power meters have strain gauges in them that measure the force and torque (the power that the cyclist applies with their legs) in order to calculate the wattage being produced. The use of a power meter is one of the most accurate ways to measure a cyclist’s progress.

Speed and Duration can show you how fast you’ve gone on a specific course or how much endurance you have built as your workout times increase. If one of my cyclists chooses to use a heart rate monitor, I always make sure to use speed and duration along with heart rate data.

RPE-Rate of Perceived Exertion is usually represented on a 1-10 scale, 1 being an easy walk and 10 being the most physical exertion you can endure for 10 to 15 seconds. RPE scales seem to work well for riders who are in tune with their bodies and who enjoy pushing their limits. Riders who do well with RPE usually find objective data unhelpful when riding, training, and racing. They might put black tape over their computer’s head unit during training and have their coach look at the actual metrics at a later time. RPE is, of course, considered a subjective metric.

Performance Testing:

Testing yourself on the same course every 3 months to see if you have improved your performance is important to overall, long-term improvement. Make sure you take tests and record them a minimum of 3-4 times a year. Be careful to record test results in your training diary, as they will show your improvement over time. In my next blog post I’ll talk more about the types of tests you can perform.

Tracking Long Term Gains:

Your subjective feedback (how you felt during the training session), and the objective data (your heart rate, watts, speed, and duration of the session) will help give you a picture of how you are progressing. If you keep good records, you will be able to look back at past years and find out what has worked best for you over time. You will also be able to see long-term trends which will help you focus your efforts on what you are making the most gains in.

Discipline:

Set yourself up for success! Create realistic habits for filling out your diary on a daily basis. Make sure that the act of filling out the diary is something that you can realistically do, at a certain time, every day. For instance, if you don’t have time to fill out your diary in the evening don’t plan on doing it then. Plan to do it when you know you’ll have the time and are free to take advantage of that time like just after your ride or during a post ride snack. Attach the chore to something you’re doing already so you’ll never forget to do it!

I try to download my power/heart rate data just after my workout if possible. I write down how my legs felt before the start of my workout, after my warm-up, and how they felt during each repetition of efforts, and then grade myself (A+ through F-).

Filling out a diary will help you make sure that you’re staying on track with your training. If you need help designing a training plan for your next big ride or event, let us know: we’re experts at it and we’ll be glad to help!

 

Red Trolley Classic Women's Race at Risk for Next Year.

If there are not at least 30 women at the Red Trolley this year, there will be no women's race in 2012.   Last year, after the 7th annual Red Trolley Classic, I wrote about how  it costs $10,000 to put on a simple industrial park criterium.    When you break that down, we are looking at a costs of $1,000 dollars an hour.   We've already written about how the SDSU cycling team and I lose money all morning during the collegiate categories, as they have a lower entry fee and relatively small fields.       While these fields are small, they are still larger than the Womens' 1-3 field.  When you have 10 riders paying an average of $27 a piece, the revenue coming in is less than $300.  That means we are running at a loss of $700 that hour, and that is after losing money all morning with the collegiate races.   I would love to support women's racing, but neither I, nor the SDSU team can  afford to do it with money directly out of our own pockets.    The profit margins are very slim at this event, and the risk of losing money is very real.    That is why we have made the decision that of there are not at least 30 women at this years race, we have no sane choice other than to cancel the  women's race in 2012.   So women... encourage your fellow racers to come out  and race.  We  really want to see you  again in 2012.

"Understanding Your Power Files" Clinic

Ok, You've got this fancy doohicky on your bike. Maybe its made in Germany, maybe its built in the US, . This fancy thingamajig may have cost you just about as much as some people spend on their entire first racing bike. It tells you how hard you are going in watts, it tells you you average watts, your max watts, it tells you how much work you've done in kiljoules, and more. It gives you all sorts of information, but what do you DO with all this information. The coaches at Crank Cycling are here to help. We work with power every single day. We sell more Power Tap and SRM power measuring systems than most bike shops. We've helped elite athletes analyze their power files, and adjust their training.  We've written articles on power for local and national cycling news outlets, and we want to share our knowledge with you with you.

This clinic will cover:

  • The basics such as how power is measured, what are the advantages and disadvantages of the different power measuring systems.
  • How, when and why you should do field testing with your power meter.
  • How to monitor and analyze individual workouts as well as weeks, months, or years worth of data.
  • Creating and implementing a training plan based on power.
  • Racing with your Power Meter
  • and more

This clinic is appropriate for anyone who owns a power meter, or anyone who is thinking about purchasing a power meter.    It is appropriate for self coached athletes as well as athletes who work with a coach (Crank Cycling or anyone else!)*.    Knowledge is power, and the more knowledge you have, the greater your chances for success.

The clinic is scheduled for Sunday November 20th at 1PM at our downtown training studio and is expected to be 3-4 hours in length.   The cost of the clinic is $99 with discounts being offered to Crank Cycling coached athletes or clubs with more  5 than athletes attending.

Registration is HERE , or use the contact form on the lower right or call Coach Burke at   six- one –nine -865-3389 for more information.

*Athletes that work with another coach may bring their coach with them to the clinic for no charge.  We welcome the company of knowledgeable coaches, and encourage their  participation in the question and answer portions of the clinic.

Crank Cycling Time Trial Clinic

This clinic is designed to help you get fast! The focus is primarily road time trials, such as the 20K and 40k events, but triathletes can also benefit from this clinic. We will also devote a portion of the class to special events such as team time trials and track events like the 4K, 1K, and team pursuit. The morning session will be indoors at the Crank Cycling Training Studio and the afternoon session will be on the bike at Fiesta Island. This clinic features coach and exercise physiologist Sean Burke, coach and Fiesta Island TTT record holder Chris Daggs.  Classroom topics in the morning include: exercise physiology basics and energy systems used during TTs, on the bike training, weight training, flexibility training, warm ups, power outputs,  pacing, aerodynamics, and more. The afternoon "on the bike" topics include: proper starts, turnarounds, course management, TTT practice, and more. This clinic can accommodate a maximum of 20 athletes. To to make sure you don't lose out,  sign up HERE.

Chris Daggs Time Trial

Aire Urban Passport

We are running  a holiday special through the end of the month.   It is a special package we are doing with the  other member of the Aire Co-Op.    For $49 bucks you get 2 cycling classes, 2 rowing classes, 2 TRX classes, and 2 personal training sessions.    This is an amazing bargain, and costs less than start up fees for a gym membership.  If you've got a friend who has been thinking about trying one of these classes, or starting a new fitness program, make sure and pass this on. Added on 12/22/09   Here is a link where you can purchase the Urban Passport. 

Aire Urban Passport