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Free Tires

Do you need some tires?  Of course you do... everyone needs tires!   Well, we have a deal for you.    All you need to do, is refer a friend to us for coaching.  Then when they sign up for coaching,  we'll  hook YOU  up with a free pair of  Hutchinson tires.   Its pretty simple!.  Just send us an email or use the contact form on the side of this page.     Do you need LOTS of tires?   Refer more than one friend and you won't have to buy tires for months!  This offer is only good through September 15th, so don't wait  too long!

Joseph LaCour Wins National Championship

Joseph Lacour won the scrathc race national championships for his age group at  master's track cycling nat's in August.   Joseph has worked hard for this, and has multiple  elite and master's state championships, but this is his first stars and stripes  jersey.   We are very proud of Joseph, and he is Coach Burke's 2nd national champ this year.  See Shawn Olin and his partner Lance who won the visually impaired tandem road race in July, and went on to represent the US at the paracycling world chaompionships.josephnatspodium pic

How much should you train? You may not like the answer.

How many miles a week should you ride? Such a simple question, but the answer isn't so  simple.  For starters “How many miles should I ride” isn’t really the right question, as not all miles are the same. Riding 50 miles on flat ground being pulled along by a group is not the same as doing a hilly ride, braving the wind in a solo effort. “How much should I train?” is really the better question. But still, there are different ways to measure “how much.” Power meters are now a common site on the bikes of pro and amateur riders alike. But before the power meter era, heart rate was considered the gold standard in training technology and many athletes used a heart rate X time metric known as TRIMP*. Now that a bike can be outfitted with a power meter for under a thousand dollars, riders of all levels are using the power related metrics as their preferred method of measuring training volume and stress. A power meter user can track daily and weekly kilojoules, and training stress score, along with acute and chronic training load as well as training stress balance**. While I love both training and coaching with a power meter, I also use a much simpler metric that pre-dates heart rate training, and power: The watch.

Saddle time is a simple metric that anyone can measure, and endurance athletes have been measuring their training in this manner for as long as endurance athletes have existed. Of course an hour at race pace is not the same training stress and an hour at recovery pace. But weekly training hours will give you a pretty good idea of total training volume. Weekly hours are not only easy to measure, but easy to understand. Some riders don’t care to learn about or use hears rate monitors or power meters. For these riders, weekly hours is going to be their best measure of how much they are training. So then the question is: “How many hours a week should I train?”

Don't overdo it and wind up looking like this

People naturally prefer simple answers to questions. But even seemingly simple questions have complex or even unclear answers. Answers to questions like: “How much improvement will I see from coaching?” or “How much should I train each week?” are difficult to answer, because everyone is different. Anyone that tells you to expect an exact amount of improvement or tells you that everyone should train a certain amount is either uninformed or untruthful.  As far as how much you should train, the answer for most people is:  As much as you can without it being too much…as much as you can train, and still recover both physically and mentally from the training.  You should train as much as you can while still ensuring that you get in the quality and intensity of your workouts. You should train as much as you can while still succeeding in your career, having a balanced social life, enjoying family time, and keeping your significant other happy.

When I’m planning the training for my athletes, the “A” (top priority) events go into the calendar first. The next items to go into the calendar are family, work, and travel commitments. The first workouts to go into the calendar are the highest intensity workouts. These efforts are typically the most important workouts of the week, and the integrity of these workouts must be maintained. If you don’t get them right, you are just spinning your wheels. Most amateur riders should not try and do the same volume of training that professional riders do, as the pros are dealing with a completely different set of commitments, priorities and circumstances. I’ve seen riders read about the weekly hours that the professionals train, and try to replicate it themselves. But for a professional rider, training IS their career. The pro rider can concentrate on recovery by napping, eating, relaxing on the couch, and maybe getting a massage. While the amateur rider with a 40+ hour a week job is often doing things that are counterproductive to recovery. Some riders increase their training volume and actually get slower, because they aren’t recovering properly in between hard workouts. One of my jobs as a coach is to ascertain: What is the optimal training load for that individual athlete. Some athletes are limited by how much time they can actually spend on the bike. For these riders, the task is to ensure that they are spending their time wisely. Some athletes have practically unlimited time to train, but I need to ensure they are recovering properly and not overdoing it. As an athlete it can be difficult to see when you are a pushing it a little too much, and that is when the objective eye of a coach can become invaluable. Athletes all have different needs, time, and stressors in their lives. All of these things must be taken into account when determining how much training volume and athlete can handle. There is no easy answer to “How many miles a week should I ride” or “ How many hours a week should I train”. It seems like a simple question, but there isn’t a simple answer. Do you need help figuring out how much is enough without being too much? Use the contact form on the right side of this page to contact us.

*TRIMP was developed by Dr Eric Bannister. Google will help you if you need to know more. ** Training Stress Score is based on the original work by Bannister. This and other terms were developed by Andy Coggan and Hunter Allen. Check out the book “Racing and Training with a PowerMeter” for more information.

3rd Annual Boulder Creek Challenge Benefiting VeloYouth.

The  Third annual Boulder Creek Challenge  Benefiting VeloYouth is scheduled for November 8th.   What do you get for your  entry fee?   A fun, unique, supported ride, as well as pie, and the satisfaction of knowing that all proceeds to to San Diego Veloyouth. Benefiting  SDVY

3rd annual Boulder Creek  Challenge  benefiting VeloYouth – November 8th 2014

Registration Here.

The Boulder Creek Challenge Benefitting VeloYouth is a 52 mile ride, but the distance can be deceptive.   The ride features a deceptively difficult 5500 feet of climbing, including dirt climbs and descents.    We’ll begin at 9 am with a neutral start out of  the Descanso Park and ride on  I-8 and the 79.  We’ll roll down the hill and into Descanso and after about 3.5 miles, the neutral vehicle will pull away and its time to unleash the hounds.  Soon after, the road turns to dirt and begins to go uphill.   About 10 miles into the ride there will be a King of the Mountain Prize for the first rider to crest the  hill,  and then you’ll have almost 5 miles of dirt road descent.   Use caution here or you’ll find yourself on the ground.   Your arms and legs will feel the fatigue as you control your bike down the dirt downhill.   Use extreme caution when crossing Boulder Creek around mile 15.  If there has been any rain recently, the crossing will be as slick as ice and the mossy surface will pull your bike out from underneath you like a magic carpet.      You are now 800 feet lower than   the original start point, and you’ve got to climb your way out.     Don’t start off too hard, as the next KOM point is still 6.5 miles and over 1200 feet of climbing away.    At times, you’ll struggle to keep  the power down as the grade exceeds 12% and your  rear wheel  spins out in the dirt.     The KOM point is at the intersection of Boulder Creek and Engineers Road.

PRIZES from SPY

The road turns to pavement here and the front group will do bonus miles over engineers road,  while the  rest of the group, will ride a more direct route to Julian.   When we arrive in Julian we’ll regroup at the Apple Valley Bakery on Main Street and enjoy some well earned apple pie.     Before long we’ll begin our neutral start out of town and back towards the start.  The ride mostly downhill from here, but we still haven’t hit the high point and final KOM  at Paso Picacho State Park, 500 feet above Julian miles into the ride.   The downhill after the KOM is dangerous.   Pay attention to the warning signs and go slower than you think you should.  I’ve seen several riders on the ground here and  have pulled  one  up off the tarmac myself.         From here you’ll  the relaxing downhill all the way back to Descanso as your hard earned reward.384225_4864079602116_1405670320_n

So what is the best bike for this ride?   I’ve done it on my road bike, cyclocross bike, and mountain bike.  The road bike is great on the paved portions but can be tough on the steep uphills and is both slower and more difficult on the extended downhills.    A lightweight mountain bike may even be the best bike to use if you want to go after the first two KOM points, but you’ll pay for the added weight and rolling resistance when the dirt turns into pavement.    Whatever bike you choose you’ll be happy with it at some points, and frustrated at others.     No   matter what bike you ride, it will make for a fun and different ride, with an apple pie stop in the middle.  You’ll also be helping out a great cause. Registration Here.

NUTRITION from POWERBAR

NUTRITION from POWERBAR

Rules:

 

The   entry fee is $35 until September 1 September 15, $45  until October 15, and $60 after November 1  and all proceeds go to San Diego VeloYouth.

Pre registration is required and closes the Wednesday before the ride.

T he roads are open to traffic and this is a “challenge” not a race.     Obey all traffic laws and do not make an ass out of yourself or you may get hurt or worse…. hurt someone else.

Do not fall off of your bike.  If you push it on the dirt downhill,  you will fall off of your bike, so use  the 80% rule on the downhills (dirt and paved!).  That means go 80% as fast as you think you should.

You must regroup  In Julian, roll out with the group, and finish at the Park and Ride in Descanso to claim any KOM prizes.  

Be self sufficient.   There will be some sag support, but don’t depend on it.    Carry tubes, air,  food, drink, and money.

Everyone must sign a waiver before the start69697_4864042201181_397887428_n_001

 

 

Additional stuff

Bars, gels, and  more provided by PowerBar.

There will be a sag vehicle at the first  two KOM  points,  as well as a  broom wagon following the last  rider.    But please carry tools, tubes, etc.

Anyone who does not eat Pie in Julian is ineligible for KOM prizes.

UPDATEL7/30/12   Coach Burke is Buying the pie!

I'll  buy  Pie for everyone.    Feel free to buy yourself some coffe or Hot Chocolate in Julian powerbarteamelite

The dirt road can be tough on your hands, don’t forget the gloves.

I am serious about the downhills, dirt ones and the paved one after the final KOM will mess you up if you push it too hard.  Don’t ruin your day or anyone else’s.   We don’t want to peel you up off the ground.

The course isn’t marked, familiarize yourself with the map, download the GPS file below, or stick with someone who knows where they are going.   If you don’t know where to go, you can always wait for the sweeper.  No one will be left behind.

GPS Files will be added soon

Registration Here.

Photos From  2012 and 2013

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Training Tip for Racing in the Heat

Do you have an event coming up where you know the mercury will be reaching the triple digits?   Full heat accilmation can take weeks, but you'll see some benefit in as little as a few days. If you have an event that is going to be in a warmer climate that your normal training rides, you can do some workouts in the heat  the week before to get yourself ready. Increased  blood plasma volume and a shift in the composition of your sweat are some of the changes that  will begin to occur.  If its not hot enough where you live and train, just do some trainer sessions and get that core temperature up.     A big pool of sweat underneath the trainer is a sign that you are doing it right.  Just be sure to hydrateduring and after the ride!

Racing outside of your strengths

By Trina Jacobson

In February,  Trina wrote about why you should sometimes race outside of your comfort zone.   Here she tells you about some of her personal experiences  doing races that did not play to her strengths:

Why do road races , criteriums, or other events that don’t play to your strengths? The short answer is that it challenges you both mentally and physically.

To enter an event that doesn’t play to your strengths takes some self evaluation:

-    Can I physically do this?

-    What is a realistic goal for this race?

-    What do I need to do differently for this race compared to others?

 

And the answers to the above questions begin the mental challenge of knowing you’ll perform to your abilities, skills, and fitness not to your hopes and dreams. Managing these expectations with regards to THIS event, prepares you for expectation management in events you are already strong in.

For example, when I line up at a local criterium, there is a fair amount of confidence in my abilities to perform well based on past performance. This is my strength, and I’ve done so many of them that the fear of the unknown is gone, because I’ve done most everything you can do in a crit: blown up and spit out the back, lapped multiple times, helped teammates win, won with the help of teammates, won without teammates, etc.

A road race with any kind of sustained climb does not play to my strength, however I have entered a few road races. Could I physically do this? Yes, I could physically ride the distance and elevation. I may not be doing it with the rest of the field, but I could do it. What is a realistic goal for this race? 1) stay with the group for a long as possible/longer than the last time and 2) help my teammates when I’m able to. What do I need to do differently for this race compared to others? 1) train a little differently, race a little differently and 2) eat a lot.

After completing what would become my best ever effort in a road race, I was completely spent and it took me days to recover physically. This is what I learned and how my crit racing has improved:

-    I had never gone as hard for as long as I did that day —> no excuses to skip out on an interval on a training ride (as long as you aren’t harming yourself).

-    I actually emptied the tank —> I have never emptied the tank in a crit, but now that I know what it feels like, let’s do it.

-    I am a good teammate —> I have a deeper appreciation for my teammates that work for me in a race, which helps with the race-time communication.

-    I was stressed before the race because I didn’t know how it would go —> I managed my stress successfully and I can use that skill at any race (or life event).

All of these things can be summed up by: My cycling as a whole is richer. My skills, experiences, and connections were deepened and strengthened. I have new and better appreciation for the local crits and have challenged myself further by taking it to the next level of a few races on the national level.

You don’t have to be a racer to apply this to yourself. The same can be said for the gran fondo rider or the weekend warrior who goes to the local group rides.

Fall Cycling Camp in Carsbad CA

POWER TRAINING CAMPGreenville Cycling & Multi-Sport and Crank Cycling are joining up to bring you a world-class training camp in sunny Southern California October 12-19,  2014. Based in Carlsbad, this camp will provide the enthusiast rider and the avid racer an opportunity to train out of a relaxing seaside resort, the Carlsbad Inn. We’ll blend a variety of rides up and down the beautiful SoCal coast along the Pacific Coast Highway with awesome rolling rides around northern San Diego County including an excursion to Palomar Mountain. Off the bike you can enjoy the trendy cafés and restaurants of Carlsbad Village just steps from the Pacific Ocean. Camp will include plenty of skills training: cornering, climbing, descending, pace-line technique as well as nutrition strategy and how to recover quickly day to day and within rides. Designed as a power training camp, you will use your own power meter or we will pair your bike with a PowerTap wheel for the duration of the camp. Each evening we will review your day on the bike in a classroom style discussion along with presentations on nutrition, training plan design and more!

For pricing, and more information, check out or flyer here:

GCC San Diego Spring Camp Oct 2014 

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GCC San Diego Spring Camp Oct 2014 

XC Mountain Bike Racing in Wet Conditions

XC Mountain Bike Racing in Wet Conditions By Richard La China

mudmen

 

After the wet and muddy race conditions this past weekend, I was inspired to share these tips...

Mud

First off, mud is going to stick pretty much everywhere on your bike.pam

Spraying Pam Cooking Spray on your frame, pedals, and tires will help a ton.  Make sure to avoid getting any of this spray on your rotors and brake calipers.

The Pam spray will reduce the mud build-up and give you a better chance of keeping your bike rolling.  Also, if you end up having to run a section of the course, you'll appreciate the fact that your bike doesn’t have 25 pounds of mud stuck to it. 

Lubricant

Use a thick chain lubricant. A thin chain lube can wash away rather quickly, but a thinker one will stay put, even when coated in mud.

 

Braking

Brake a bit early before a corner because brake pads will not be as responsive as in dry conditions.

 

Visibility

Wear a cycling cap under the helmet to shield some of the rain from hitting your glasses. Also, using an anti-fog product (Rain-X) does wonders in preventing you from becoming legally blind on a technical climb or descent.

Mind Control

Stick with it. Bad weather can cause a lot of racers to mentally check out either before the race even starts (the DNS group) or half-way into the race (the DNF group). This leaves the field wide open for the podium spots for those that simply refuse to quit and/or ride aggressively.

 

Tires

mudtires

There are two schools of thought on tire selection.

  • Option 1: Race a wide, aggressive tire that can grab the terrain (while shedding mud).  Problems with this is if you have narrow chain/seat stays (and/or fork), the mud can build up between your tire and the stay eventually slowing you down to a halt.   If you have plenty of clearance, this may be a good option.
  • Option 2: Skinny is better (1.95 or 1.75).  The idea is that the skinny tire can cut through the mud and find some terrain to connect with.  Also, this provides for good clearance between your chain/seat stays thus less mud build up.

Clothing

When it's wet, it's usually cold.   So, the tendency is to wear more clothing.  Be careful, there is a fine balance between wearing enough to keep warm, and too much potentially causing performance inhibiting over-heating.   If you haven't warm warmed up yet and you're already warm -- you're probably wearing too much.

Nutrition / Hydration

Just because it's cooler and you're surrounded by water -- doesn't mean you don't need to drink.  Use your water bottle, catching rain drops on your tongue isn't enough.   Also, this is still a race -- make sure you eat as you normally would.  Because of the wet conditions, you'll want to keep your hands on the handlebars more than normal -- with this in mind, make sure you food is easily accessible (pre-opened packages, snacks in foil, PowerBar Gels taped to your top tube, etc.).

Practice

If you think there’s a chance you’ll be racing in wet conditions, go practice riding in wet conditions!   However, if the trails are really wet it may be best to avoid them to prevent trail damage.  Use good judgment.  If you're not sure, check with the park ranger.

 

After Race Bike Clean Up

Clean your bike as soon as possible after the race.  Bringing a spare gallon of water and soft brush (like a dust pan brush) should workout perfect to get the majority of the debris off your bike.  Be careful not to spray water directly into any part of your bike that has a bearing (bottom bracket, steering tube, hubs) or your fork.  Water can damage bearings (even sealed ones).  Lastly, be sure to lubricate your bike directly after cleaning it.mud cleanup

Have fun!

 

 

Trina's first track experience.

Coach Trina talks about her first experience on the track.   She has since embraced it and has made track cycling a big part of her racing and training program. Getting On the Track

 I  started my cycling hobby on the road and it took me several years to get on the track. I preferred to kit up and ride from my house. I was too lazy to pack the car and drive somewhere to ride what had just been packed in the car. So, it wasn’t until a few years ago that I got on the track. My friend Alison offered to help me find a track bike and pick me up for weekly coached workouts, plus I needed to see what this track racing business was all about…I was getting schooled at almost all the crits by a local phenom half my age who is now a World Champion on the track. You might have heard of her: Jennifer Valente. 

At the first workout, listening to Alison and  the other track riders  talk was like listening to a foreign language and I felt overwhelmed, so I asked a lot of questions. They were answered with motor pacing. YEEEEE-HAAAAWWWWWW!!!!! I couldn’t’t sleep for hours after getting home that night because my heart was still racing from both the effort and the excitement!  Why did I wait so long to try this?!

After several weeks of workouts, it was time to go to TNR (Tuesday Night Racing). For a minimal fee, I was able race in 3 races, watch other categories race, have an announcer, and an audience that actually CHEERS! This sounded super fun (and productive) to me!

I was told to race with the B group based on my road experience. ( Mixed men and women, but a women's only category is  once a month)  So, after stressing about which cog to warm-up on I lined up at the rail and off we went. Warm-up was like a well-rehearsed circus act with 3 groups of riders (A’s, B’s, C’s) all riding single file on the blue line. What a sight to see as the sun was setting!

It took me a few weeks to be able to finish with the group, but that didn’t matter because I felt as if I were FLYING! My crit racing was benefiting from the track time, my love of the sport of cycling had deepened by trying another form, and I was making new friends, even though they were freaking me out with all the talk about The Black Curtain.

 

With a couple of seasons in my legs, I can ride toward the front of the group, bridge to breaks, time my efforts, and move around the track with ease compared to a year ago. When some of the A’s crash the party in the B’s, I get my  but kicked. That’s ok; my goals just need to be adjusted for the night.

The Lessons

 1.     Help and encourage your friends. I am so thankful to have a friend like Alison. She made taking the first few laps around the track less scary.

2.     Find out what the cream of the crop does. If you want to join them on the podium (or match their run time or land a similar job), you have to know what they know.

3.     Give it time. New things always feel awkward and unnatural. After several sessions of practicing your new skill, you will be more comfortable.

4.     Create intermediate goals. I haven’t won a race at TNR yet.  Along the way to a win, I have small goals, like staying in longer, moving up faster, and holding my down my food.  The good thing about our local track racing scene, is that you usually get at least 3 races a night.  So if you mess up the first  one, you get a change to try again!

5.     Track racing is tons of fun, and it is great training for road and crit racing.   It is tough to simulate that kind of intensity outside of a race, and track cycling  fits the bill.

Ready to try the track?   Crank Cycling coaches teach the developmental classes at the San Diego Velodrome, you can even borrow a track bike

USAC Track Cycling Clinics

usac track clinic Tuesday Night Clinic: Feb 25 & March 4, 6PM-8PM

or

Wednesday Night Women’s Clinic Feb 26 &March 5, 6PM-8PM

Nutrition Provided by:sponsor-powerbar

 We will work on training and racing techniques such as: Motorpacing, bumping, advanced pacelining, race strategies,  safe and effective sprinting/race finishes, situational awareness, and more.

Location: San Diego Velodrome.  Attendance at 2 nights required to complete clinic. Must have your own track bike, a valid USAC license, and track experience.  Clinic has no bearing on local TNR categories. Registration opens on 1/16/14 and closes 24 hours before the event.    Registration for each 2 day clinic is $60 before February 21, or $70 after Feb 21.   Registration closes 24 hours before the clinic start time.  Each   2 day clinic is limited to 25 riders.  The rain date for both events shall be March 11, 6-8PM

 Register at the Crank Cycling Registration Page

Track Category upgrade points may be earned according to Rule: 1E4(a):USA Cycling sanctioned and approved rider education clinics (at least half day), will count as three qualifying races for category 5 to 4 upgrades, up to a maximum of 5 qualifying races. It will also count as 4 upgrade points for a category 4  to 3 upgrade and 3 upgrade points for a category 3 to 2 upgrade

 

How to jump over and obstacle on your mountainbike

by: Richard La China, USA Certified Cycling Coach with Crank Cycling How to Jump

The biggest mistake I see riders make when trying to jump is the lack of compression and explosion just prior to the jump.  If you don’t compress and explode, your bike will behave very similarly to a rock.  Gravity will get the best of you (and your bike) and will promptly get pulled down to earth — not typically the desired result.

1. Prior to attempting the jump, get off your bike and inspect the lip of the jump and the landing.  Figure out what the best angle for approach is and exactly where you’d like to land your bike.  Once you’ve determined the best line, stick to it — it’s very difficult (and potentially dangerous) to change your line while flying through the air.

2. As soon as your front wheel gets to the face of the jump, compress your bike into the ground.   Your elbows should be out, knees bent — full Ninja (ready) position.  Note: You don’t need suspension on your bike to compress it — compressing is merely the action of throwing your weight downward.

3. Just prior to reaching the lip of the jump, explode!  This explosion is a quick pull up with your arms and legs. If your timing is correct, you will sail right over it.  If you are riding uphill, throw your weight forward as you go over an obstacle.  If you are riding downhill, you will need to shift your weight backward as you go over it.

4. Once you’re flying, relax and resume your Ninja (ready) position and keep looking forward to your intended landing spot.

5. Push your bike down onto your desired landing spot to increase your traction.  Your arms and legs are your primary suspension when landing — your body need to soak up the impact.  Relaying on your suspension solely tends to cause a hard landing and a potential for loose of traction.

That should be enough to get you started — I recommend starting with a small obstacle at first.  As you progress, experiment with controlling your landing, both wheels, rear wheel first, distance, height, etc.  Note: Avoid landing on your front wheel, that usually doesn’t end well.

As your confidence (and skill) increases, pick bigger obstacles, going up and down hill while jumping, experiment with your air-time and HAVE FUN!

Spy Red Trolley Classic 2014

The 2014 Spy Red Trolley Classic Criterium is going to have some changes! For starters, we are moving to the " Hunnekens" course just across the street from the old course. Spy has once again stepped up to be title sponsor of the event, and we have partnered with CAF and Operation Rebound to offer handcycle and upright cycle categories, and the event will also be a fundraiser for Operation Rebound supporting first responders with physical disabilities. Keep an eye out for a race flyer and a press release soon!

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Carlsbad Training Camp 2014

Our 2013  Carlsbad training camp was a great success.  Our riders enjoyed many of the best roads that San Diego has to offer, and we  are looking forward to  the 2014 edition.   With an added day or riding, this one is going to be even better.  Will you join us from February 16-23?

About The Camp

Greenville Cycling Center and Crank Cycling are joining up to bring you a world-class training camp in sunny Southern California! Based in Carlsbad, this camp will provide the enthusiast rider and the avid racer an opportunity to train out of a relaxing seaside resort, the Carlsbad Inn.

San Diego Spring Cycling Training CampWe’ll blend a variety of rides up and down the beautiful SoCal coast along the Pacific Coast Highway with awesome rolling rides around northern San Diego County including an excursion to Palomar Mountain. Off your bike you can enjoy the trendy cafés and restaurants of Carlsbad Village while just steps from the Pacific Ocean!

This camp will include plenty of skills training: cornering, climbing, descending, pace-line technique as well as nutrition strategy and how to recover quickly day to day and within rides.

Our San Diego camp is a power training camp. Use your own power meter or we will pair your bike with a PowerTap wheel for the duration of the camp. Each evening we will review your day on the bike in a classroom style discussion along with presentations on nutrition, training plan design and more

GCC-San-Diego-Spring-Camp-2014

Camp Cost is $2499 per person based on double occupancy and the Carlsbad Inn www.carlsbadinn.com, and $2999 for single occupancy, with only a $500 deposit required to hold your spot.

Register Here    or contact  Sean Burke at 619-381-9080 or Sean@crankcycling.com.

Camp Schedule and Detail:

Sunday , Feb. 16

  • 11:00am – 2:00pm – Arrival San Diego Airport
  • 2:20pm – 3:00pm – Transport to Carlsbad Inn
  • 3:00pm – 6:00pm – Camp/Hotel check in, bike assembly, and shakedown ride
  • 7:30pm – Camp Meeting/Overview

Monday , Feb. 17

  • 7:00am – 8:30am – Continental breakfast
  • 9:40am – Preride briefing
  • 10:00am – Ride Day 1: Fiesta Island with Torrey Pines and  power tests (70miles, rolling/hilly terrain, 2000ft of climbing)
  • Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available
  • 3:00pm – 3:30pm – Coach led stretching session
  • 4:00pm – 4:50pm – Functional Strength and Conditioning Class
  • 5:00pm – 6:30pm – Daily training file analysis and training review
  • 6:30pm – Dinner

Tuesday, Feb. 18

  • 7:00am – 7:45am – Continental breakfast
  • 8:00am – Preride briefing
  • 8:30am – Ride Day 2: Dana Point Coast Ride (70miles, flat/rolling terrain, 1500ft of climbing) OPTIONAL: campers and coach may join 8:15am Wed Worlds ride; regroup @ sprint
  • Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available
  • 3:00pm – 3:30pm – Coach led stretching session
  • 5:25pm – 6:30pm – Daily training file analysis and training review
  • 6:30pm – Dinner

Wednesday, Feb. 19

  • 7:00am – 8:15am – Continental breakfast
  • 8:50am – Preride briefing
  • 9:00am – Ride Day 3: North County Hills (75miles, rolling terrain, 4500ft of climbing)
  • Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available (upon camper request)
  • 3:00pm – 4:00pm – Yoga for Cyclists; Monica Daggs RYT
  • 4:00pm – 5:00pm – Training plan design plus training Q & A; coaching staff
  • 5:00pm – 6:30pm – Daily training file analysis and training review
  • 6:30pm – Dinner

Thursday Feb. 20

  • 7:00am – 8:15am – Continental breakfast
  • 8:50am – Preride briefing
  • 9:00am – Ride Day 4: Palomar Mtn (65miles, mountainous terrain, 6500ft of climbing)
  • Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available (upon camper request)
  • 3:00pm – 4:00pm – Nutrition for Cycling; Sean Burke
  • 5:00pm – 6:30pm – Daily training file analysis and training review
  • 6:30pm – Dinner

Friday Feb. 20

  • 7:00am – 8:15am – Continental breakfast
  • 8:50am – Preride briefing
  • 9:00am – Ride Day 5: Relaxed ride along the California coast  Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available (upon camper request)
  • 3:00pm – 4:00pm – Nutrition for Cycling;
  • 4:00pm – 5:00pm – RR/Crit/TT Strategy & Tactics plus racing Q & A; coaching staff
  • 5:00pm – 6:30pm – Daily training file analysis and training review
  • 6:30pm – Dinner

Saturday, Feb. 22

  • 6:45am – 8:15am – Continental breakfast
  • OPTIONAL 7:30am – Coach and riders depart to meet Swamis group ride @ 8:15am
  • 8:50am – Preride briefing
  • 9:00am – Ride Day 6: Elfin Forest Long (80miles, hilly terrain, 4500ft of climbing)
  • Lunch during the ride
  • Massage therapist available (upon camper request)
  • 3:30pm – 5:00pm – Daily training file analysis and training review; Q & A
  • 6:00pm – Dinner at local restaurant

Sunday, Feb. 23

  • 6:45am – 8:15am – Continental breakfast
  • 12:00pm – hotel checkout

 

Payment Info/Cost:

  • $$2499Double Occupancy, Single Occupancy $2999.  $  Per day fee $250.

A $500 deposit is required at time of registration.  A 10% administration fee applies to any cancelations.  Cancelations accepted up to 40 days prior.  Final payment is due three weeks prior to camp and at this time all payments are final and non-refundable.  Register Here    or contact  SeanBurke at 619-381-9080 or Sean@crankcycling.com.

 

Arriving and Departing San Diego:

  • Please book your flight to San Diego International Airport (SAN).  Our preference is for you to arrive between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Pacific Standard Time on Sunday February 16.  Once you’ve booked your flight, please forward your flight plans to us so we can arrange our pick-up schedule.

 

Bike Transport:

  • You can check your bike with your luggage to arrive with you or you can ship your bike via FedEx or UPS.  If shipping your bike, do check with us as we can secure you a discounted rate.  Ship to:

Chris Daggs 917 Wentworth Circle Vista, CA 92081

  • Bike assembly, disassembly, and packing for return trip are included in your camp experience!

 

Lodging & Accommodations:

Carlsbad Inn Beach Resort 3075 Carlsbad Blvd. Carlsbad, CA 92008 760-434-7020 www.carlsbadinn.com

Weather:

  • San Diego, CA has wonderful weather all year long!  February has average low of 51 degree and high of 65.  Humidity is relatively low in February.

 

Camp Checklist:

  • Bike, clean & mechanically sound
  • Helmet (helmets are required on every ride)
  • Cycling Shoes with relatively new cleats
  • Sunglasses, various lenses
  • Power meters*: PowerTap power meters available at $100 for entire camp, used PowerTaps also available after camp (ask us for more details)
  • Saddlebag with 2 tubes, tire levers, etc (do not fly with CO2 cartridges!)
  • Bibs & Jerseys
  • Windvest
  • Arm-warmers & knee-warmers
  • Lightweight jacket
  • Rain jacket
  • Base layers
  • Shoe covers
  • Various gloves, full-finger included
  • Sunscreen
  • Chamois Cream
  • Storage bag, backpack or like to keep in sag vehicle while on road
  • Government issued ID card (driver’s license, government ID, or passport needed to pass through Camp Pendleton)

Boulder Creek Challenge Benefitting VeloYouth

Boulder Creek  Challenge  benefiting VeloYouth - November 16th 2013 Registration Here.

The Boulder Creek Challenge Benefitting VeloYouth is a 52 mile ride, but the distance can be deceptive.   The ride features over 5500 feet of climbing, including dirt climbs and descents.    We’ll begin at 9 am with a neutral start out of  the Descanso Park and ride on  I-8 and the 79.  We’ll roll down the hill and into Descanso and after about 3.5 miles, the neutral vehicle will pull away and its time to unleash the hounds.  Soon after, the road turns to dirt and begins to go uphill.   About 10 miles into the ride there will be a King of the Mountain Prize for the first ride to crest the  hill,  and then you’ll have almost 5 miles of dirt road descent.   Use caution here or you’ll find yourself on the ground.   Your arms and legs will feel the fatigue as you control your bike down the dirt downhill.   Use extreme caution when crossing Boulder Creek around mile 15.  If there has been any rain recently, the crossing will be as slick as ice and the mossy surface will pull your bike out from underneath you like a magic carpet.      You are now 800 feet lower than   the original start point, and you’ve got to climb your way out.     Don’t start off too hard, as the next KOM point is still 6.5 miles and over 1200 feet of climbing away.    At times, you’ll struggle to keep  the power down as the grade exceeds 12% and your  rear wheel  spins out in the dirt.     The KOM point is at the intersection of Boulder Creek and Engineers Road.  The road turns to pavement here and the pace will mellow as we head into the town of Julian.    When we arrive in Julian we’ll regroup at the Apple Valley Bakery on Main Street and enjoy some well earned apple pie.     Before long we’ll begin our neutral start out of town and back towards the start.  The ride mostly downhill from here, but we still haven’t hit the high point and final KOM  at Paso Picacho State Park, 500 feet above Julian( ~40) miles into the ride.   The downhill after the KOM is dangerous.   Pay attention to the warning signs and go slower than you think you should.  I’ve seen several riders on the ground here and  have pulled  one  up off the tarmac myself.         From here you’ll  the relaxing downhill all the way back to Descanso as your hard earned reward.384225_4864079602116_1405670320_n

So what is the best bike for this ride?   I’ve done it on my road bike as well as a cyclocross bike.  The road bike is great on the paved portions but can be tough on the steep uphills and is both slower and more difficult on the extended downhills.    A lightweight mountain bike may even be the best bike to use if you want to go after the first two KOM points, but you’ll pay for the added weight and rolling resistance when the dirt turns into pavement.    Whatever bike you choose you’ll be happy with it at some points, and frustrated at others.     No   matter what bike you ride, it will make for a fun and different ride, with an apple pie stop in the middle.  You’ll also be helping out a great cause. Registration Here.

 

Rules:

 

The   entry fee is $25 and all proceeds go to San Diego VeloYouth.

Pre registration is required and closes the Wednesday before the ride.

T he roads are open to traffic and this is a “challenge” not a race.     Obey all traffic laws and do not make an ass out of yourself or you may get hurt or worse.... hurt someone else.

Do not fall off of your bike.  If you push it on the dirt downhill,  you will fall off of your bike, so use  the 80% rule on the downhills (dirt and paved!).  That means go 80% as fast as you think you should.

You must regroup  In Julian, roll out with the group, and finish at the Park and Ride in Descanso to claim any KOM prizes.  

Be self sufficient.   There will be some sag support, but don’t depend on it.    Carry tubes, air,  food, drink, and money.

Everyone must sign a waiver before the start69697_4864042201181_397887428_n_001

 

 

Additional stuff

Bars, gels, and  more provided by PowerBar.

There will be a sag vehicle at the first  two KOM  points, and coach  Burke will be a sweeper  for  ride carrying tools, a  tire boot, and some tubes.

Anyone who does not eat Pie in Julian is ineligible for KOM prizes and has to start 2 minutes behind the group when we roll out of  town.

You buy your own pie, I’m already giving you PowerBars.powerbarteamelite

The dirt road can be tough on your hands, don’t forget the gloves.

I am serious about the downhills, dirt ones and the paved one after the final KOM will F*%&  you up if you push it too hard.  Don’t ruin your day or anyone else’s.   We don’t want to peel you up off the ground.

The course isn’t marked, familiarize yourself with the map, download the GPS file below, or stick with someone who knows where they are going.   If you don’t know where to go, you can always wait for the sweeper.  No one will be left behind.

Update 10/22   Spy Optic has donated a set of glasses for  one of the KOM prizes  SpyLogo

GPX file for The Boulder Creek Challenge

Map of  of the Boulder Creek Challenge

Registration Here.

  Photos From  201229402_4864108682843_1805113187_n 69697_4864042201181_397887428_n_001 302796_4864025920774_439480521_n 196092_4864042641192_1057490521_n 405067_4864113642967_1477775813_n

 

OBSTACLE COST VS. RETURN

2013-10-08-10.50.44-amIf your goal is to reach the finish line in the least amount of time, you need to evaluate obstacles based on cost. What that means is you may be an amazing technical rider; but if you expend large amounts of energy riding every technical section in a race that takes over six hours to complete, you might be better off walking a few of those sections. A short hike up an extremely gnarly section can save your legs for a strong race finish. If you have the option to jump something or take a more direct line — going off the jump isn’t always the best choice. Your photo from Pink Shorts Photography might be a great new Facebook cover photo, but it wont necessarily get you the podium you’re looking for. Jumping increases the risk for injury or a mechanical. If you choose to jump, know the jump and take it with 100% confidence.

-Coach Richard

Donuts in the Breakroom

Donuts in the Breakroom, by Trina Jacobson 800px-Donuts

I’ve cracked on most things cycling. I’m pedalling squares, I don’t have any motivation to figure out the logistics of getting all of my training time in, and I am tired. I have not abandoned my bike, but I am riding less and I haven’t yet begun off-season strength training, which means I’m thinking a lot about calories. Today, my goal to not gain any weight in the off season was tested all day long by 2 dozen donuts sitting in the breakroom when I arrived to work.

 

8:42 AM – Who keeps bringing this crap in?!

9:01 AM – It’s funny how people cut pieces off. They’ll be back for more pieces; add them all up and they will have eaten an entire donut, if not more. They might as well sit down and enjoy the donut.

9:25 AM – I can’t stop thinking about them.

9:27 AM – The office smells like donuts.

9:51 AM – I wonder if research was done on what color box should be used. Is pink supposed to entice me more than, say, green?

10:04 AM – Did Conrad ever do his Tour de Donuts?

10:32 AM – Yeah…I’m going to eat a donut and enjoy it. A lot. Check this lemon jelly-filled one out!

10:33 AM – Yumminess in my belly.

10:45 AM – I don’t think my donut ride is the same as The Donut Ride. If you are ever in the Cardiff area of San Diego, visit VG Bakery for the best chocolate old fashioned around, I defer to Seth Davidson regarding The Donut Ride in Redondo Beach, and to UCSD Cycling for the Tour de Donuts.

11:22 AM – That donut is why my inner thigh rubs my seat post. I need to ride or run a little extra to burn that off. (I look up nutritional information on lemon jelly-filled donuts) Whoa! If I only look at calories, it’s not as bad as my usual energy bar. I should re-think my bars…

12:45 PM – OK, I made it through a healthy lunch without even looking at the donuts. Wait, now I’m thinking about them again.

1:39 PM – I’m so sleepy…sugar craaaassshhh…

1:53 PM – I need a taste…just a little taste. (The smell makes me kind of sick so I walk away)

1:59 PM – As I walk by the break room window, I can see there is half of a pink frosting and sprinkles donut left.  It looks sad all alone.

2:25 PM – I eat an apple while resentfully looking at the remaining quarter of the pink frosting and sprinkles donut.

3:30 PM – It’s GONE! How could my co-workers do that to me! Didn’t they know I was dabbing the drool off my face all afternoon?! I guess I have to eat my bar and think about my missteps towards being the Lantern Rouge of Office Donuts.

I know the best defense to such temptations is a good offence: bring a lot of your own good foods with you to work. So, tonight I made a batch of Oat and Cottage Cheese Pancakes from a recipe I found in a magazine a few years ago. I created a lazy version that doesn’t require the use of a blender or food processor. Washing the blender is my least favorite chore.

 

Oat and Cottage Cheese Pancakes

1 cup quick oats ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese, preferrably small curd 1 large egg

 

Using a fork, mix ingredients. Divide into 4 pancakes. Cook over medium heat until golden brown about 3 minutes each side.

 

2 of these pancakes is plenty for breakfast, especially with hearty toppings. My favorite topping is Greek yogurt and fresh fruit. My son gobbles these Special Pancakes up. I have made them with instant flavored oatmeal and they were super yummy, but higher in sugar. Stiring fruit into the batter didn’t work well as they fell apart because of the consistency. These are even good cold, which is convenient when you don’t have a lot of time to snack at work.

Enjoy!